Night Life

Posted: October 27, 2011 in Uncategorized

This is an article that I wrote for journalism. I turned it in having just received the information a few hours ago. So it’s rough. The instructor may tear into it. That isn’t the reason I’m posting it, however.

The reason I’m posting it is simply because this beat reporter is so cool! And he’s speaking during my journalism class on Tuesday!

(No Title)

PEORIA—Matt Buedel’s job requires him to be ready to respond
at a moment’s notice, and what he does has real impact on people’s lives. He’s
not a physician or a policeman. Nor is he a fireman or a civil service employee.
He’s a beat reporter covering crime for the Greater Peoria Area.

How does
a reporter’s job have real impact? In Buedel’s case, it involves believing in
what you do.

“One of the better quotes about what a journalist does,”
Buedel said, “is, ‘Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.’”

One of his recent stories involved a woman unfairly targeted by a police
officer for a loaded gun discovered in the backseat of a car. She was harassed
by the officer for her “noninvolvement,” as Buedel put it.

The officer’s
out-of-line behavior resulted in the woman’s car being confiscated, a $520 cost
to get it out of impound.

Buedel inquired about the incident. He made a
few phone calls and wrote the story. As a result, the woman received her car
back for free.

“That’s a tangible difference,” Buedel said, who
obviously believes in what he does.

Although not everyone knows Buedel,
if they have read the Peoria Journal Star then they’ve felt his influence. The
newspaper reaches a circulation of approximately 65,000 people daily. Whether he
writes about the 57 grams of marijuana found by police on May 20th of this year,
or the fire that ripped through a row of historic buildings in Minonk, he sheds
light on police and fire activity for readers.

Engaged and with a
seven-year-old daughter, the 32-year-old Buedel has worked for the Peoria
Journal Star 12 years. During that time, he has covered transportation, worked
as a state desk reporter, and covered both Tazwell and Woodford County
Government. Crime is his beat now.

When asked whether there’s a
difference between working the crime beat or covering other news beats, he said,
“Absolutely! In the most basic way: attire. You generally don’t need to be
prepared at any moment to stand outside in a freezing downpour all day as a city
hall reporter. But that’s what I have to be ready for in case of a major fire or
other incidents—like the Minonk fire yesterday.”

Buedel said he made his
news contacts mostly through regular interaction with officials at the scene of
the crime and at other proceedings. He’s on the street or at the police station
every day, writing four-to-five stories per week.

In today’s
technological world, reporters not only write their articles, they also post a
blog, take pictures or video, then tweet the information and use social media
sites like Facebook to get each story out. According to Buedel, in today’s world
all reporters do more with less.

 

(No Title)

PEORIA—Matt Buedel’s job requires him to be ready to respond
at a moment’s notice, and what he does has real impact on people’s lives. He’s
not a physician or a policeman. Nor is he a fireman or a civil service employee.
He’s a beat reporter covering crime for the Greater Peoria Area.

How does
a reporter’s job have real impact? In Buedel’s case, it involves believing in
what you do.

“One of the better quotes about what a journalist does,”
Buedel said, “is, ‘Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.’”

One of his recent stories involved a woman unfairly targeted by a police
officer for a loaded gun discovered in the backseat of a car. She was harassed
by the officer for her “noninvolvement,” as Buedel put it.

The officer’s
out-of-line behavior resulted in the woman’s car being confiscated, a $520 cost
to get it out of impound.

Buedel inquired about the incident. He made a
few phone calls and wrote the story. As a result, the woman received her car
back for free.

“That’s a tangible difference,” Buedel said, who
obviously believes in what he does.

Although not everyone knows Buedel,
if they have read the Peoria Journal Star then they’ve felt his influence. The
newspaper reaches a circulation of approximately 65,000 people daily. Whether he
writes about the 57 grams of marijuana found by police on May 20th of this year,
or the fire that ripped through a row of historic buildings in Minonk, he sheds
light on police and fire activity for readers.

Engaged and with a
seven-year-old daughter, the 32-year-old Buedel has worked for the Peoria
Journal Star 12 years. During that time, he has covered transportation, worked
as a state desk reporter, and covered both Tazwell and Woodford County
Government. Crime is his beat now.

When asked whether there’s a
difference between working the crime beat or covering other news beats, he said,
“Absolutely! In the most basic way: attire. You generally don’t need to be
prepared at any moment to stand outside in a freezing downpour all day as a city
hall reporter. But that’s what I have to be ready for in case of a major fire or
other incidents—like the Minonk fire yesterday.”

Buedel said he made his
news contacts mostly through regular interaction with officials at the scene of
the crime and at other proceedings. He’s on the street or at the police station
every day, writing four-to-five stories per week.

In today’s
technological world, reporters not only write their articles, they also post a
blog, take pictures or video, then tweet the information and use social media
sites like Facebook to get each story out. According to Buedel, in today’s world
all reporters do more with less.

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Comments
  1. Allison says:

    Thanks for sharing your article! Buedel is a great example of how one make a difference through the power of words. Teaching is one way I hope to make a difference … the other is through writing.

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